Upper “East” Side: Asian Air Care Trends

We live in a world that continues to become increasingly globalized. With this shift, consumers desire to genuinely understand and connect with other cultures. The global air care market reflects this multicultural mindset with exotic flavor-inspired ingredients incorporated into their fragrance creations. Marketers look to the Upper “East” Side for inspiration and often seek to […]

We live in a world that continues to become increasingly globalized. With this shift, consumers desire to genuinely understand and connect with other cultures. The global air care market reflects this multicultural mindset with exotic flavor-inspired ingredients incorporated into their fragrance creations.

Marketers look to the Upper “East” Side for inspiration and often seek to learn what inspires and influences the Asian consumer and what fragrance and lifestyle trends are shaping and driving the Asian air care market.

Fresh Start

Freshness is the overall “feeling/experiential” trend in Asian air care, while olfactive preferences vary within the continent.

Singaporeans are drawn to scents that have a mix of flowery and fruity nuances, while people in the Indian subcontinent favor more traditional aromas like sandalwood or orange flower.

North Asians find green smells like cucumber most appealing, opposed to the Middle East population who tend to like opulent floral notes such as rose.

Oud-blend home fragrances, like those created by London-based Singaporean master perfumer Martin Koh in collaboration with local lifestyle boutique Poetree, play well in the more tropical climates of China.

Asian air care trends in Japan reflect the consumers’ love for the idea of “softness”, whether in the product name or in the scent itself. Fabric softeners are highly regarded and often used in place of actual fragrance. Floral notes are preferred, although in general, brand, style and status drive sales more than scent.

In Korea, air care olfactive trends lean more towards fruity, floral, fresh chypre-esque fragrances. The Korean consumers want their scents to be light and unobtrusive. Oriental, spicy and gourmand notes are not considered appealing in this culture.

Strike the Right Note

In examining Asian air care trends, specifically the Asian luxury candle market, there is a focus on floral and fruity floral fragrances. Similarly, certain notes and nuances take center stage as the primary scent in key product launches. These include jasmine, neroli, oud and citrus as well as rose.

The Asian consumers’ affinity for these notes has a great deal to do with what emotions and mindsets they associate with them. For instance, jasmine was the scent of choice when a sampling of Asian consumers were asked what scents would make them feel “relaxed” or “more sensual”. Rose, on the other hand, was seen as comforting, while citrus evoked feelings of being “refreshed”.

Feeling at Home

Asian air care trends reflect not only what fragrance preferences drive consumer spending, but more importantly, what feelings and experiences consumers hope to derive from them.

Ultimately, trends in Asian air care echo a consumer population who simply strive to surround themselves with feel-good fragrances and create a space where they can feel at home.

Agilex Fragrances